Midlife crisis averted courtesy of AC/DC

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Photo: Paul Failla

Thank you AC/DC for stepping in front of the train that is the midlife crisis and bringing it to a halt, because it was about to roll right over me.

Last night the band played at Wrigley Field — a show that completely and utterly rocked, and not only entertained me but also brought a bit of the fountain of youth back to seeing live music.

Lately, seeing bands has not been so good for my fragile midlife state.

First there was the Phish show where my husband had to hold me back from telling a collection of 17-year-old boys smoking way too many bowls that their mamas were waiting at home, hoping they’d come back in one piece, so please just stop. My latest midlife angst was brought on full-scale earlier this year by seeing Van Halen perform… on Ellen… playing “Jump.” Our vow to no longer pay money to see old 60s artists perform occured after seeing far less of Crosby, Stills & Nash than we should have due to all the Baby Boomers getting up to use the bathroom.

After a quick text conference with my husband and the luck of finding a sitter to watch our kids (who are more B-96 than WLUP) we headed to Wrigley to get some tickets. (Bargain shoppers would be impressed by how much we paid.)

After passing up the $10 light-up devil horns to get our $11 drinks, we found ourselves right on time to not hear the opening song so well (public service — don’t get 300-level tix for guitar-based music at Wrigley) but moved toward our section (500 level, up high but great sound) for the second, “Shoot to Thrill.” It just got better from there.

The people-watching was superior. The diversity of generations was surprising, and for once we might have been older than the average age. There were plenty of the expected rock dudes and guys formerly known as such. But there were also“kids” in their 20s and old rockers in their 60s. We saw middle-age moms wearing the devil horns with their middle-school sons. We saw college girls humoring their moms who were dancing in the aisle to every single song. There were clusters of GenX chicks throwing from their elegant wrists some of the daintiest horns I’ve ever seen, their diamond-y watches flashing from 10 rows down.

These folks sound like cliches, but how many of us appear our unique selves to the outside world? Didn’t matter. Everything about that AC/DC show was about rock-n-roll. Everyone in that stadium (except for maybe the worried-looking woman in front of us) was enthralled with the spectacle that it was.

The highlight of the show was the closing song before the encore — “Let There Be Rock,” the song that inspired my fingertips to text our sitter and see if she was free that evening. Until that point the walkway that extended from the main stage and ended at a smaller circular stage in the crowd had been unused. At the end of the song Angus Young played his way to that circle to launch a God-knows-how-long solo. When he got to the center, he flopped on his back as ticker tape exploded from all around the stage lit like fireworks from the lights. I don’t care how Spinal Tap such antics might seem, it was awesome!

And he kept playing, making his was back to the main stage. Everything went dark, but you could still hear him playing guitar. When the single spotlight came up a few minutes later, he was on top of his wall of amps, the single shadow of his school-boy-uniform figure on the giant black curtain. It was exactly what I needed to see.

Witnessing this, I might have been envious of his energy or felt old because I don’t have it. I might have imagined with regret a younger me climbing on my husband’s shoulders in the first row. Instead Angus invited me in, like he did for every other person in that stadium. For my place and time, there was nothing better to remind me of who I used to be and actually still am.

Thanks again, AC/DC. This one might last me until I turn 50.

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10 thoughts on “Midlife crisis averted courtesy of AC/DC

  1. stephen1001 says:

    haha, in Canada the horns were $20! But the drinks were a (bargain?) $9.25.
    Ridiculous – but what a show by Angus & friends!

    • After seeing so many bands that have dialed it down some notches, it was awesome to see one that is so committed to doing such a completely rock-n-roll show. We suspected that Brian Johnson was getting some help here and there with pre-recorded vocals, but he used it judiciously. I seriously could not believe the energy level of Angus Young.

  2. Terrific review. Enjoyed it very much. No noise pollution there, eh?

  3. boppinsblog says:

    I saw their last 2 tours but so far missed this one.
    I really hope they stick around long enough, or if they retire they extend this tour longer and come back up north.
    Nice review. I am guessing the drummer(Chris Slade) and rhythym guitarist(Stevie Young) held their own. Too bad about Malcolm and Phil Rudd, but the show must go.
    \../ \../

    • Christ Slade and Stevie Young were totally fine. Only once did things get a smidge out of sync — otherwise they were quite capable of providing the backbone.

      I hope you get to see them again!

      • boppinsblog says:

        Good to hear. I was thinking of doing a few posts about Chris Slade and Stevie Young in their other previous, lesser known bands. Too bad I have so many potential posts rattling around my brain.

        I hope so too. I would suspect if this was their last studio album, they would extend the tour for a retirement such as Scorpions or Motley Crue.

      • I think people would appreciate it.

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